Pyrrosia penangiana (Hook.) Holttum

Family

Polypodiaceae

Nomenclature

Pyrrosia penangiana (Hook.) Holttum, Rev. Fl. Malaya ed. 1, 2: 146, f. 62. 1955 [‘1954’]; Tagawa & K.Iwats., Acta Phytotax. Geobot. 23: 52. 1968; Hovenkamp, Leiden Bot. Ser. 9: 218, f. 18. 1986; Tagawa & K.Iwats., Fl. Thailand 3: 503. 1989; Hovenkamp, Fl. Males., Ser. II, Ferns and Fern Allies 3: 166. 1998; Boonkerd & Pollawatn, Pterid. Thailand: 288. 2000. – Niphobolus penangianus Hook., Icon. Pl, t. 203. 1840; Bedd., Handb. Ferns Brit. India: 332, f. 182. 1883. – Cyclophorus penangianus (Hook.) C.Chr., Index Filic.: 200. 1905; Bonap., Notes Ptérid. 14: 66. 1923. – Type: Dalhousie s.n. (E, K), Peninsular Malaysia, Penang.

Pyrrosia mollis (Kunze) Ching, Bull. Chin. Bot. Soc. 1: 53. 1935. – Niphobolus mollis Kunze, Bot. Zeit. 6: 121. 1848.

Description

Rhizome short, 3–6 mm diam., bearing stipes closely on short phyllopodia, scaly; scales attached at base, linear-lanceolate, gradually narrowing from base towards tailed apex, 2.6–9.4 by 0.5–1.3 mm, entire, brown to pale brown, concolorous, entire and hairless at margin. Fronds simple. Stipes very short, not distinct from rachis with decurrent laminae on both sides, densely stellate hairy. Laminae spathulate, broadest at apical portion, narrowing towards base and then broadly decurrent as wings of stipes, 11–72 x 1–8 cm; rachis raised on both surfaces, main lateral veins more or less visible, the smaller veins obscure, copiously reticulate; thick but rather soft, the upper surface glabrescent, the lower surface densely covered with stellate hairs. Sori on the apical portion of fronds on the lower surface except marginal areas, one to each areole, in distinct oblique bands.

Distribution in Thailand

SOUTH-WESTERN: Prachuap Khiri Khan; PENINSULAR: Phangnga, Satun, Yala.

Wider Distribution

W Malaysia, Sumatra and Java; also recorded from Burma (Tenasserim).

Ecology

Collected on rocks (often limestone) at low altitudes.

Proposed IUCN Conservation Assessment

Least Concern (LC). This species is widespread and not under any known threat.

Habit

Habit

Whole plant from above

Whole plant from above

Upper frond surface

Upper frond surface

Lower frond surface with sori

Lower frond surface with sori

Sori

Sori

Young sori

Young sori

More mature sori

More mature sori

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