Tectaria crenata Cav.

Family

Tectariaceae

Nomenclature

Tectaria crenata Cav., Fl. Descr, pl.: 250. 1802; Tardieu & C.Chr., Fl. Indo-Chine 7(2): 407. 1941; Holttum, Rev. Fl. Malaya ed. 1, 2: 510. 1955 [‘1954’]; Tagawa & K.Iwats., SouthE. Asian Stud. 5: 98. 1967; Tagawa & K.Iwats., Fl. Thailand 3: 372. 1988; Holttum, Fl. Males., Ser. II, Pterid. 2: 80. 1991; Boonkerd & Pollawatn, Pterid. Thailand: 212. 2000. – Type: Née s.n., Marianas (MA; fragment BM).

Aspidium repandum Willd., Sp. Pl. 5: 216. 1810; Bedd., Suppl. Ferns Brit. Ind.: 46. 1892.

Aspidium pachyphyllum Kunze, Bot. Zeit. 1848: 259; Bedd., Suppl. Ferns Brit. Ind.: 46. 1892.

Description

Rhizome short, erect, densely covered with scales at apex; scales up to 13 by 1.5 mm, linear-subtriangular, dark brown, stiff, entire at margin. Stipes about 60 cm long, stramineous, densely scaly at base, glabrescent upwards. Laminae pinnate, broadly oblong, about 70 by 45 cm; rachis very sparsely minutely scaly, winged at upper part; lateral pinnae 8–9 pairs, basal pinnae the largest, oblong-lanceolate, each with a large basal lobe, about 25 by 4.5 cm, lobes caudate at apex, subentire or undulate, up to 16 by 3.5 cm, middle pinnae oblong-lanceolate, caudate at apex, gradually narrowing towards base, sessile and very slightly decurrent at base, irregularly crenulate at margin, about 23 by 4 cm, herbaceous, green on upper surface, paler beneath, glabrous; costa raised beneath, glabrous, main veins distinct, 7–9 mm apart, veinlets reticulate to form irregular anastomosis with included free veinlets. Sori terminal on included free veinlets, one for each areole, in two rows between adjacent main veins; receptacle a little elongate; indusia naked, persistent .

Distribution in Thailand

SOUTH-EASTERN: Trat; PENINSULAR: Surat Thani, Nakhon Si Thammarat, Trang.

Wider Distribution

Malesia and Polynesia extending north to N Vietnam.

Ecology

On mountain slopes in dense forests at low to medium altitudes.

Proposed IUCN Conservation Assessment

Least Concern (LC). This species is widespread and not under any known threat.

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